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Transport maths

I have just spent around 4 hours calculating the exact emissions of the cargo ship I took to South America last summer, and how much more efficient it is than flying. It actually came pretty close to my original estimate, so I’m fairly chuffed..

If you don’t like maths, look away now, but this is pretty rigorous:

All figures are based on the MSC Monterey, a ship with:

  • 59300 DWT deadweight
  • 4860 TEU capacity
  • operating 4 B & W diesel engines, with combined output of 39,352 kW
  • 54,549t tonnage

Appendix 1

 

CO2 Emissions Calculations for MSC Monterey on voyage Antwerpen-Callao

150.6 t d-1 daily fuel consumption[i]

496.1˙ nm d -1 rate of travel (based on 8930 nautical miles at average speed of 14 knots)

150.6 t d-1 / 496.1˙ nm d -1 = 0.30356 t fuel/nm

= 0.3 t/nm

0.3 t/nm * 8930 nm = 2710.86071 t

=2710.9 t total fuel for trip

0.3 t/nm / 4151 t (based on 70% capacity of 59300 DWT) = 7.33079 x 10-5

= 7.3 x 10-5 nm fuel/ t cargo

7.3 x 10-5 nm/t * 8930 =0.65464 t fuel/t cargo

= 0.7 tf /tc

 

0.7 tf /tc * 3.1 (CO2 conversion factor[ii]) = 2.11318 t/tc

= 2.1 t/tc

2.1 t/tc * 8930nm = 18870.67157 t/tc

18870.7 t/tc

18870.7 t/tc * 0.000058t (my weight) = 1094.49895 kg CO2 equivalent

= 1094.5 kg CO2e

= 1.1 t CO2e


[i] DEFRA 2011 Guidelines to Defra / DECC’s GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting (July 2011) Produced by AEA for the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra)

[ii] CE Delft, Germanischer Lloyd, MARINTEK & Det Norske Veritas Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Shipping and Implementation of the Marine Sulphur Directive (2006) Delft

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